Week 3 summer 2 Opal’s work 15.6.20.

Week 3 summer 2 2020

Topic-What can you see in the summer?

Play/creative ideas for home-

Creative: 1. Can you make a lighthouse? 2. Can you make a container to put on the pulley system? 3. Make telescope or binoculars and talk about how we use them. 4. Show chn photos of lighthouses and ask them to paint a picture of one.

Imaginative play- Create this and play with it- A lighthouse, blue material sea, rocks on either side, boat on sea, x2 characters, rocks piled up for cliff, house, rope and pulley across sea.

Construction-Can you make a lighthouse? Use wooden bricks, lego, duplo etc- can you make it: Tall, taller, short, shorter?

Draw a lighthouse on a Paint program on a computer or I-pad if you have one.

Literacy- The Lighthouse Keepers Lunch- see video.

Day 1– Introduce story. Explain that this is a story. How do we know?

Has anyone read this story before?

Has anyone been to a lighthouse?

What does a lighthouse do?

What is a LH Keeper?

Read the story, stopping to ask the following questions:

Why does it have to be so tall? Why does the light need polishing? What does industrious mean? Why did the ships hoot?

Which food do you like from the lunch list?

What does brazen and ingenious mean?

Why are they putting Hamish in the basket?

What is mustard?

Why didn’t they like the mustard?

What is a sea shantie?

Why was the LHK happy in the end?

Task- Make mustard sandwiches for the seagulls following hygiene rules and thinking about each step.

Play a listening game where one child is blindfolded in the middle of a circle. The children in the circle take it in turns to say ‘It’s only me the hungry seagull’ in a squeaky voice. The blindfolded child guesses who was speaking/where in the room the child was.

Day 2- Re-cap on story from yesterday.

Show chn the basket and talk about what could be inside it.

Uncover. It’s the hungry seagulls and some of the words they said in the story.

Give pairs a speech bubble each to read from the seagulls x9.

Read some out.

Show chn new speech bubbles. What other things might the seagulls have said in the story?

T write ideas on new speech bubbles and read out together.

Display them.

Writing task- Draw each step of making a mustard sandwich and write a short caption for each.

Day 3, 4, 5.

Handwriting- Tt formation. Practise writing in upper case, T and lower case t.

Extra challenge for the handwriting- can they sit at a desk and use a pencil with correct tripod grip? Can they hold the paper with one hand to stop it moving and write with the other hand? Can they write on lined paper and try to keep their letters an equal size and shape?

  • Practise letters and sounds on your sound mat.
  • Read to a grown-up.
  • Share a story book together and talk about the story.
  • Practise your tricky words- reading and writing them. (3 a day).
  • Read an e-book on book club.
  • Have a go at ‘Phonics Play’ – some games are free.

Phonics plans are on a different download- phonics needs to be done daily for 20-30 minutes.

Maths- daily plan

Children find one more and one less than numbers up to 20, linking this to adding and subtracting 1. They count on 2, 3 or 4 from a hidden quantity (e.g. cars in a car park, pennies in a tin, bears in a cave) so that they cannot recount the first quantity but must add by counting on. They count back where the remaining quantity is hidden in order to encourage counting back. They read and match number sentences to practical problems. A number track is used to support counting on to give totals up to 20 and counting back from numbers up to 20.

KEY LANGUAGE : one more; next number; add; equals; makes; numbers 1 to 21, count on; altogether; one less; take away; subtract; numbers names one to twenty, count back.

Outcomes

At the end of the week children can:

  • say the number that is one more than any number to 20
  • read and understand the corresponding addition
  • use fingers to count on 2, 3 or 4 to give a total up to 10
  • begin to use a number track to count on 2, 3 or 4 for totals up to 20
  • find one less than any number to 20 (or 12 or 10) by counting back one/seeing the number before on the washing line
  • read and understand the corresponding subtraction
  • use fingers to count back 2, 3 or 4 from numbers up to 10
  • begin to use a number track to count back 2, 3 and 4 from numbers up to 20

Day 1- Say the number that is one more than numbers up to 20 and understand that adding 1 gives the next number.

  • Make a pegged number line using the washing line and pegs and number cards from 1-20.
  • Make a tower of five cubes all in one colour. Show me on your fingers the number of cubes in the tower. Now show me the number that is one more.
  • Add one cube to the tower and write the matching addition on the whiteboard: 5 + 1 = 6 . Five and one more is six.
  • Find 5 on the washing line and point out that 6 is the next number after 5.
  • Repeat, this time showing 9 cubes, 5 in one colour and 4 in another so that it is easier to see how many there are. Children show the number that is one more. Ask for a volunteer to write the addition on the whiteboard whilst you add the cube. Point out how 10 comes after 9 on the washing line.
  • Repeat a few more times and once children get the idea, do some ʻsilent mathsʼ. Show a tower of cubes. Children hold up the number of fingers to match the number of cubes, then show you the number that is one more.
  • Give each child a number card from 5 to 21.
  • Point to 10 on the washing line. Hold up your card if you have the number that is one more.
  • Repeat for each number from 4 to 20, in random order. It may help to keep a record of these numbers and cross them out as you point to them so that every child gets a turn. Occasionally ask volunteers to write the matching addition on the whiteboard.

Task- If chn find this easy- play one more with a pack of 0-20 number cards. Throw one down and the child has to say what one more is really fast. How many do they know? If chn find this hard- practice adding one more to numbers to 20 practically using lego, pasta etc.

Day 2- Add 2, 3 or 4 to a number up to at least 10 by counting on.

  • Show a covered car park (an upturned cardboard box with a door cut). ʻDriveʼ three cars into the car park then show two more. These cars are going to go and park next.
  • Ask children to hold up three fingers to show those cars already in the car park, and then hold up two more fingers to work out how many are in the car park now.
  •  Write on the flipchart: 3 + 2 = 5 . Lift up the cardboard box to check the total.
  • Ask a child to drive two more cars into the car park. Children hold up five fingers, and then two more. Show me how many cars you think are in the car park now. Lift the box to check then record the addition on the flipchart.
  • Repeat, this time asking a child to drive three more cars into the car park.
  •  Ask a child to drive another two in, and model counting on two on the track saying, eleven, twelve. Lift the box to check. Ask a volunteer to write the addition on the flipchart.

Task- Give child a pack of number cards 0-20. They reveal one card each time from the pack, then roll a dice. Add the two numbers together by counting on from the pack card. Record as an addition if child is able to or just record the answer each time. Practise numeral formation as you write the numerals, getting them the right way round and starting in the correct place each time.

Day 3 Count on two, three or four pennies.

  • Show children a tin/money box, and count in five pennies. How much is in the tin? Show me on your fingers. Drop in two more pennies, saying, six, seven. Now there are seven pennies in the tin. Write on the flipchart: 5 + 2 = 7
  • Show me seven fingers. Iʼm going to drop two more pennies into the tin. Do this then ask children to put up two more fingers to show you the new total. Ask for a volunteer to write the addition on the flipchart.
  • This time (Caitlin) is going to drop in three more pennies. Ask a child to drop in three more pennies one by one as you say, ten, eleven, twelve. What addition can we write now?
  • Repeat, asking a child to drop in two, three or four more pennies. Each time ask for a volunteer to write the addition on the flipchart.

Task-If chn find this easy- put a 5p or a 10p in the tin and add 1ps and 2ps to make totals up to 20. They can record this or do it orally. If chn find this hard, continue with initial task, adding pennies by counting on some more each time.

Day 4- Find one less than numbers up to 20.

  • Make a pegged number line using the washing line and pegs and number cards from 1-20.
  • Arrange the 20 dog biscuits in a line and, as a class, count them. You may prefer to start with 12 biscuits, or with 10. Choose the starting number that is appropriate for your class.
  • Introduce Lucy the dog (or an alternative name for the puppet). Explain that she loves these biscuits. Get her to ʻeatʼ the last biscuit in the line. Now there is one less biscuit. How many biscuits are left?
  • Point to 20 on the washing line. Say that one less than 20 is 19. Write on the whiteboard: 20 − 1 = 19 . If necessary, count the remaining biscuits to check.
  • Say that Lucy is being a good dog so she can have another biscuit. Ask one of the children to help her ʻeatʼ another biscuit. There were 19 biscuits, now there is one less. How many biscuits are there now?
  • Point to 19 on the washing line and ask a child to point to the number of remaining biscuits. Ask for a volunteer to record the subtraction on the whiteboard.
  • Continue like this until you reach 10 biscuits, children can now show the answers on their fingers.

Repeat until Lucy has eaten all the biscuits. Greedy Lucy!

Task- If chn find this easy- play one less with a pack of 0-20 number cards. Throw one down and the child has to say what one less is really fast. How many do they know? If chn find this hard- practice taking away one from numbers to 20 practically using lego, pasta etc.

Day 5- Subtract 2, 3 or 4 by counting back.

  • Make a pegged number line using the washing line and pegs and number cards from 1-20.
  • Set up a ʻbusʼ using ten chairs and ask ten children or toys to sit on the bus. How many children are on the bus? Children answer by holding up ten fingers. All make the noise of the bus as it chugs along, then stops at the bus stop. (You could make some signs saying ʻBus Stopʼ or just pretend to stop at various stops.)
  • Roll the dice and explain that the number shown on the dice is the number of children who are going to get off the bus, e.g. two. Ask two children to stand up ready to get off the bus one at a time. One gets off the bus. How many now? Show me on your fingers. And now the other person gets off. How many now?
  • Write on the whiteboard: 10 − 2 = 8 and read it together. Ten take away two equals eight or ten subtract two equals eight .
  • Point to 10 on the washing line and model counting back two, saying, nine, eight. Ten count back two is eight.
  • Repeat, rolling the dice, and asking that number of children to stand, then leave the bus one by one. The rest of the children fold down a finger for each count back.
  • Model the subtraction on the washing line and ask for volunteers to record the subtraction on the whiteboard.
  • Continue until no one is left on the bus. Remind children how to write zero.

Topic-

Summer sticks! Go out and about to collect a range of sticks of different lengths. Provide brightly-coloured paint, fabric strips, pipe cleaners and ribbons for children to decorate their sticks by wrapping, tying and gluing the materials. When dry, display the children’s sticks in the garden or create mini teepee-style structures by binding them together at the top.

Favourite things. Ask the children ‘What is your favourite thing about summer?’ You could provide them with a range of options to choose from including the warmer weather, going on holiday, going on picnics, playing outside and so on. Children may also have suggestions to add to the list. Ask children to explain their choices, encouraging others to listen politely and show sensitivity to other children’s likes and dislikes. Chn could write their own lists.

Sunny songs. Play the children a recording of the song The Sun Has Got His Hat On, there are some good examples online. Encourage the children to listen carefully and begin to join in when they feel confident. Display the words for children to follow and introduce actions such as clapping the beat. Ask ‘Who thinks they can sing along?’ and ‘Who can clap out the beat?’ You could add percussion instruments for children to play to provide more challenge. Try adding other actions such as tapping their feet, clicking their fingers and miming putting a hat on!

Physical Development/outdoors- gross motor skills-

Can you make a pulley system in your garden with a rope and other materials?

Can you build a giant lighthouse outside with junk modelling equipment e.g. boxes, cartons, yoghurt pots etc. How will you fasten them together?

Make a picnic with a grown-up and eat it outside.

Have an ‘egg’ and spoon race outside with someone in your family.

For developing fine motor control or ‘Funky Fingers’ as we call it at school (developing finger muscles and hand-eye co-ordination) – Light House Keepers Lunch colouring sheets or pencil control sheets on Twinkl.