Opals home learning 6.7.20.

Week 6 summer 2 2020

R.E. week. Topic- Being Special: Where do we belong?

Play/creative ideas for home-

Creative: 1. Paint or collage your favourite food, place, toy, animal or activity. 2. Make a picture frame for a picture of you or your family or your pet to go in.

Play with something you have not used for a while e.g. a jigsaw which you’ve not had time to do, a toy you had forgotten about or read a new story from ‘Bug Club’.

Dress up in your favourite clothes and take a picture to send to the class. You could write a caption about your picture underneath it.

This week, the R.E. tasks are instead of Literacy as we will be doing this instead of literacy/topic at school. See under topic.

Day 3, 4, 5.

Handwriting- Ww and Xx formation. Practise writing in upper case, W X and lower case w x.

Extra challenge for the handwriting- can they sit at a desk and use a pencil with correct tripod grip? Can they hold the paper with one hand to stop it moving and write with the other hand? Can they write on lined paper and try to keep their letters an equal size and shape?

  • Practise letters and sounds on your sound mat.
  • Read to a grown-up.
  • Share a story book together and talk about the story.
  • Practise your tricky words- reading and writing them. (3 a day).
  • Read an e-book on book club.
  • Have a go at ‘Phonics Play’ – some games are free.

Phonics plans are on a different download- phonics needs to be done daily for 20-30 minutes.

Maths- daily plan

Children partition five, six and ten objects into two groups in order to find all the pairs of numbers with totals of 5, 6 and 10. The matching additions are recorded and read. Children count on 1, 2, 3 or 4 from any number to give totals up to 20, and begin to count back 1, 2 or 3 from numbers up to 20.

KEY LANGUAGE : add; total; equals; pairs, one more; one less; add; subtract; next; before, add; equals; altogether; count on; number names ten to twenty, subtract; take away; count back; number names ten to twenty.

Outcomes-

Children can:

  • find and begin to know the pairs of numbers with a total of 5, then 6
  • read and understand addition number sentences
  • find and begin to know the pairs of numbers with a total of 10
  • begin to use pairs to 10 and fingers to work out a missing number in an addition
  • find one more and one less than any number to 20 on a number track
  • read and understand the + and − signs
  • count on to add 2, 3, or 4 to give totals up to 20
  • begin to use a bead bar or string or a number track to add by counting on
  • begin to count back 1, 2 or 3 from numbers up to 20
  • read subtraction sentences.

Day 1- Show all the ways of making 5 or 6 and begin to know pairs to 5 and 6 by heart.

  • Before the lesson, cut out several pieces of white card, approximately A5 in size. Also cut out number cards 0 to 6.
  • Ask children to show you a total of five fingers, some on one hand and some on the other. Encourage them to show a different way to their neighbour.
  • Ask one child to come up to the front of the class. What addition can we write to go with the way Kyle is showing five? Write on a piece of card, e.g. 3 + 2 = 5 and stick it to the flip chart. Who else is showing this sum?
  • Establish that some children might be showing 2 + 3 = 5: the same pair of numbers in a different order.
  • Who has a different way? Invite children up to show different ways of making five, asking for their help in writing the matching addition on a card to stick to the flip chart.
  • Has anyone got a different way? Do you think weʼve got all the ways of making five? Rearrange the sums on the flip chart, in order, to make it easier to spot if any are missing. Is anyone showing zero on one hand and five on the other? If not, add 5 + 0 = 5 and 0 + 5 = 5 to the list.
  • Give out the number cards 0, 1, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5 and 6 so that each child has a card. Each child makes a tower of cubes according to the number on their card. (Some children will just hold on to their zero cards.)
  • On the count of three, ask children to try to find a partner so that, together, they have six cubes.
  • Afterwards, invite pairs of children up to the front of the class to show their pair to six. Write the corresponding addition on a card e.g. 4 + 2 = 6 and stick it to the flip chart. For each pair, ask children to change the order in which they are standing so children can see that they can also show 2 + 4 = 6.
  • Have we got all the ways of making six? Reorder the sums on the flip chart to make it easier to see if any are missing.
  • Show a tower of up to six cubes to the class. Whoʼs got the tower that goes with this one to make six? Repeat for each number up to six.

Task- Have two sets of number cards 0-6. Lay them all face down on the floor. Take turns to find pairs of cards that make 5 first, then 6 secondly. If you want to extend further, write down all the additions.

Day 2- Partition 10 into pairs; read the matching additions; find a missing number in an addition to 10.

  • Show the ten pegs on a coat hanger with the same colour pegs together. Partition them into nine pegs and one peg. Turn the coat hanger round to show that 9 and 1 makes 10 and so does 1 and 9. Write on the whiteboard, side by side: 9 + 1 = 10 and 1 + 9 =10 .
  • Repeat for 8 and 2, 7 and 3, 6 and 4, then 5 and 5.
  • Ask children to close their eyes while you hide the last two pegs (as children see them) with a cloth. Children open their eyes. Show me ten fingers. Now show me how many pegs you can see on the coat hanger. How many fingers are folded down? That’s how many are hiding! Write on the whiteboard: 8 + ☐ = 10, then write 2 in the box.
  • Ask children to close their eyes again whilst you hide five pegs. Open your eyes. Show me, on your fingers, how many pegs you think are hiding. Write on the whiteboard: 5 + ☐ = 10. Remove the cloth. Were they right?

Repeat, hiding other numbers of pegs up to ten, including ten. Each time, write an empty box for children to complete. When you hide all ten pegs, write: 0 + ☐ = 10. I hid all of them!

Task-Make a missing number sheet for your child. Write a selection of missing number additions that make 10 on a sheet for child to complete individually. E.g. 3+_=10    7+_=10    _+9=10    _+1=10    4+6=_

Day 3 Say the number one more or one less than any number to 20.

  • Before the lesson, make a card showing +1 on one side and −1 on the other.
  • Sit the teddy on number 6 on the number track. Teddy loves to jump! Heʼs going to jump to the number that is one more than six. Show me, on your fingers, the number you think he is going to jump to . Check responses and encourage children to say how they know.
  • Make Teddy jump on to 7. Were children right?
  • Move Teddy to number 9. Now Teddy is going to jump to the number that is one less than nine. Show me, on your fingers, the number you think he is going to jump to . Again, ask children to say how they know.
  • Make Teddy jump on to 8. Were children right?
  • Ask a child to come and place Teddy on any number they want to, up to 20. Hold up a card showing +1 or −1. Children whisper to a partner the number Teddy will move to. Does their partner agree?
  • The child then moves Teddy by either adding 1 or subtracting 1.
  • The rest of the class show thumbs up or down according to whether they think Teddy has jumped to the correct number. If he hasnʼt jumped to the right number, they help the child to move him to the right number.
  • Repeat, inviting different children to place Teddy on the track then add or subtract 1, according to what you show on the card. Always ask children to whisper the answer to a partner before they move Teddy.

Task-Use a pack of 0-20 number cards. Play one more/one less. Show child a number, then tell them one less, child then has to say one less, repeat until all pile is used up changing one less/one more each time. How many can they get right?

Day 4- Use the bead bar to count on small numbers to give a total up to 20; begin to use a number track to count on up to 20.

  • Make a pegged number line to 20 using the washing line and pegs.
  • Show children 15 beads on the left of the bead bar, as the children see it. Say the number together. Fifteen.
  • Iʼm going to add three more beads. I wonder how many there will be then. Ask children to hold up three fingers. This is how many we will add.
  • Separate three beads from the right of the bead bar. Then move them across one at a time to join the others as you count on sixteen, seventeen, eighteen . As you do this, children fold down one finger for each bead you move and join in with your count.
  • Write on the whiteboard: 15 + 3 = 18 .
  • Use number cards 9 to 20 and give one card to each child. Ask a child to show 16 beads on the bead bar. Help them to hold it so that the beads are on the left as the rest of the class see it. If we add two beads to this side, I wonder how many weʼll have then. Children hold up two fingers . This is what we will add.
  • Say sixteen as you point to the 16 beads then silently slide two more beads across to join them, one by one. Children fold down a finger with each bead and whisper to a partner how many beads there are now. Any children with the answer on their card should hold up their card. Record the addition on the whiteboard.
  • Repeat, choosing numbers from 7 to 17, asking a child to show that number of beads on the bead bar then silently adding two, three or four more beads, one at a time. Children silently count on using their fingers and whisper the answer to a partner. They hold up the answer if they have the correct card. Record all the additions on the whiteboard.
  • Finally, use the washing line instead of the bead bar to perform an addition. Find 14 and add 4 by counting on. Children show four fingers and count on, folding down one finger for each number as they count.

Task- Give each pair of children a bead string. They move five beads to the left. The first pair roll the dice and add that number of beads to their five beads, counting on as they do so. Repeat for each pair in the group until one pair reaches 20 beads to win.

Day 5- Count back 1, 2 and 3 from numbers up to 20.

  • Make a pegged number line to 20 using the washing line and pegs.
  • Show children 15 beads on the left of a 20-bead bar as they see it. Iʼm going to take away three beads. I wonder how many Iʼll have left. Ask children to hold up three fingers. This is how many we are going to take away.
  • Separate three beads from the 15, then move them to the right as you count back, fourteen, thirteen, twelve. Children fold down one finger with each bead moved and join the counting back.
  • Agree the answer. Twelve beads left. Write on the whiteboard: 15 − 3 = 12 .
  • Use number cards 5 to 19 and give one number card to each child. Ask a child to show the 20 beads on the bead bar. Help them to hold it so that the beads are on the left as the rest of the class see it. If we subtract two beads, I wonder how many will be left. Children hold up two fingers. This is how many we will subtract.
  • Separate two beads, and move them to the right, one by one as you count back. Help me to count as you fold down your fingers. Nineteen, eighteen. Who has the answer? Any children with the answer should hold up their card. Record the subtraction on the whiteboard.
  • Repeat, choosing numbers from 8 to 20, asking a child to show that number of beads. Then move one, two or three beads one at a time, asking children to help you to count back using their fingers. Children hold up the card with the answer on, if they have it. Record all the subtractions on the whiteboard.
  • Show a subtraction using the pegged number line rather than the bead bar, e.g. 17 − 3. Children hold up three fingers and help you count back, folding down one finger with each number they count back.

Task- Give each pair of children a bead string with all 20 beads on the left. The first pair roll the dice and move that number of beads to the right, counting back as they do so. Repeat for each pair in the group until one pair has moved all 20 beads to the right to win.

Topic-

Day 1- Why am I special?

How do I know? Who tells me/thinks I am special/loved?

What can I do that is special? Why do you like some activities more than others?

Help chn to understand that each person is unique and valuable. Help them to understand that although we are all different, we are still all special and it’s ok to be different from your friend/s.

What kind of things have happened in your lives that made you feel special? Talk and share. Help chn to understand that some of these things might be similar/different but that’s ok.

Task-Draw myself, my family, something I like or am good at. Compare with friends as we work and talk about differences.

Day 2- How do we show love, respect, care?

How do you know what people are feeling? What things can we do better together rather than on our own? What makes us feel special about being welcomed into a group of people? Talk and share.

Task- We are all different circle game. (Ball and e-book). If you cannot get onto Twinkl, Elmer is another good book for talking about differences.

  • Start the session by playing ‘Stand Up, Sit Down’. All the children begin by sitting on the carpet. The adult says a statement, such as “Stand up if you have brown hair.” All the children who think they fit into that category, stand up. If it doesn’t apply to them, then they stay sat down.
  • Play this game with physical appearances, such as hair, eyes, clothes (dress, shorts, shoes, etc.). Move on to likes, e.g. “Stand up if you love reading,” (or football, or singing, building models).
  • Explain that you are going to read a book all about how people are similar in some ways and different in others. Read the lovely Twinkl Originals story, ‘We Are All Different’, to the children.
  • Ask the children why they think the book is called ‘We Are All Different’. Listen to the children’s suggestions and re-enforce the message that everyone is special and unique. Everyone looks different, has different families, has different likes and dislikes and different things they enjoy and are good at.
  • Then, look at the end page of the book. What did all the children have in common? They were all friends! Explain that although everyone has their own likes, favourites, looks and family, we can all be friends.
  • Look at some of the pages of the book, such as the pages showing the character’s favourite fruit or favourite colours. Ask the children if everyone likes the same things – did all of the children like eating bananas? Did they all like the colour black?
  • Say to the children that similarities and differences are what make us special and unique. Explain that we are going to learn about what other people in the group like and remind the children that we may all have differences, but we can all be friends.
  • Support the children to sit in a large circle. Ensure that each child has a space to sit where they are comfortable and can see the other children in the group.
  • Ask the children a question to think about, such as “what is your favourite colour?” Show the children the large ball and explain that they are going to roll the ball to a friend across the circle. When they get the ball, they are going to say their favourite colour and then the name of their friend and roll the ball to them.
  • For example, “My name is Mrs Andrews, my favourite colour is orange. Sophie, what is your favourite colour?” Sophie would then hold the ball, say her favourite colour and then ask a friend across the circle their favourite colour, “My favourite colour is green. Zach, what is your favourite colour?”
  • This continues until all the children have had a turn to say their favourite colour. Children could stand up if they haven’t yet had a turn, to make it clear who to roll the ball to next. This is also a great way to encourage children to learn the names of other children in the group.
  • Once everyone has said their favourite colour, encourage children to think about the answers and remind children about the message of the story – some were the same and some were different, but we are all friends.
  • A different topic could then be introduced, based on those seen in the story. For example, favourite fruit or classroom activities.
  • To finish the activity, thank the children for joining in so nicely and listening to each other’s ideas. Remind the children that it is great to be unique and special and that we are all friends, regardless of how we are similar or how we are different.

Encourage children to think about other similarities and differences as they are playing – maybe they could tell a friend their favourite animal or their favourite song?

Day 3- Religious beliefs are that each person is unique and valuable.

Talk about what I believe- how each person is special and just because they are different, doesn’t mean I don’t like them. I accept them because I value everybody. Just because someone believes something different to me, doesn’t mean I don’t have to like them. I accept they think and believe different things. That’s ok.

Christians believe that God loves each person. Christians and Jews believe God loves each person even before they are born, and they are written on the palm of his hand.

Jesus loved chn. In the Bible there is a story that says some chn wanted to see Jesus and the disciples tried to stop them. But Jesus said he wanted the chn to be with him.

Read chn story from Storyteller Bible for chn.

Task- Draw round hands, write names and decorate with your favourite things.

Day 4- How is God’s love for chn shown in Christianity through infant baptism?

Who has been involved in a baptism? Find out what chn have experienced and what they know about baptism.

Watch a video of an Infant Baptism (Dottie and Buzz). Google ‘Dottie and Buzz Baptism’.

Discuss the above question with the chn. What kinds of things did you see? How did you know God was showing his love? How does it make you feel special?

Task- What do you like about baptism? Label what you draw.

Physical Development/outdoors- gross motor skills-

Outside, draw a chalk picture in your favourite colour.

Practise doing something you are good at outside e.g. riding your bike, skipping, running, then practise doing something you find tricky outside e.g. balancing, hop skotch.

For developing fine motor control or ‘Funky Fingers’ as we call it at school (developing finger muscles and hand-eye co-ordination) – Start to make a summer scrap book of all the lovely things you have done so far, adding pictures of yourself working at home, things you have found or collected, drawings and writing you have done. Cut them out, label them. Have fun making it personal to you! Decorate the front cover with your favourite things!